Moldavite in Ancient Lore and Legend

Posted by Radka Volhejnova on

The green stones from the sky have been prized by humans as far back as the Early Paleolithic period for sharp-edged tools and arrowheads, as well as wearing them as amulets. Some of these amulets were found in the same archeological dig as the Venus of Willendorf, the oldest known Goddess statue, and may have been used to honor her. They were also discovered in layers of strata containing pottery associated with Late Neolithic cultures.


In Czechoslovakian folklore, Moldavite was believed to bring good luck and harmony to maritial relationships and for centuries was given as a betrothal gift. Throughout the Middle Ages Moldavite was so highly prized only nobility or royalty were allowed to wear it, and in later centuries was quite popular worn in pendants and as adornments in men’s walking sticks. Many specimens reside in various museums and institutions, private collections, and even NASA possesses a number of Moldavites.

In the 1960’s the Swiss government gave a gift of Moldavite to Queen Elizabeth II on the tenth anniversary of her coronation, a beautiful naturally sculpted raw stone set in platinum and surrounded by diamonds and black pearls. There was also a rosary of faceted Moldavite beads with a carved Madonna made for Pope John Paul II as a gift from the Czechoslovakian people.

In the last century, Moldavite has found acclaim as a spiritual relic associated with the legends of the Holy Grail. In recorded history, the Grail vessel was held to be the cup which caught the blood of Christ as He died on the cross. In the Arthurian romances, the Grail cup magically passed among the knights and ladies seated at the Round Table during the feast of Pentacost, giving each the food they most desired – holy nourishment. A drink from the Grail brought healing and rejuvenation, and a spiritual awakening. It guided the knights on quests for their right paths of destiny.


In some versions the Grail was the chalice used by Christ at the Last Supper, while others believed the Grail was not a cup, but a stone – an Emerald that fell from the sky out of the crown of Lucifer during the war between God and Satan, and was brought to earth by angels who remained neutral. The ancients called all clear green gemstones “Emeralds” and Moldavite is the only such stone to fall from the sky. In other stories, the cup was carved from the Emerald. Some translators interpret the Emerald as being from Lucifer’s forehead and not his crown, and have linked this with the pearl fixed in the brow of the Indian god Shiva. Called the Urna, this stone is like the Third Eye that allows one to see inward to knowledge and perfection.

In history an actual “Grail” was discovered and brought to Napoleon, a bowl called the Saint Graal reputed to be a platter used by Christ at the Last Supper. Napoleon, under expert examination, was disappointed to find it was made of green glass. While Moldavite is green glass, there is only speculation as to whether the true bowl might have been substituted to keep it from Napoleon, or whether the bowl was indeed the Grail. Another historically noted chalice made of gold and adorned with Moldavites was used as an ostensory (a vessel in which the consecrated Host is presented for the veneration of the faithful), and was passed down through the centuries but disappeared during the Second World War.

Moldavite’s Sanskrit name is Agni Mani, meaning “fire pearl.” In the 1930’s the famed artist and mystic Nicholas Roerich drew a close analogy of Moldavite, the fire pearl, to the Stone of Shambhala, the most sacred jewel of Tibet believed to be of celestial origin from the constellation of Orion, and further asserted it must be the same stone as in the Holy Grail.

Moldavite is also associated with the phoenix, consumed by fire and reborn in fire, a symbol of transfiguration and spiritual renewal. It is also referred to as the Philosopher’s Stone, the Grail of alchemists, for its qualities of transformation and the bestowal of youth and longevity.


For more extensive information on Moldavite, read Moldavite: Starborn Stone of Transformation by Robert Simmons and Kathy Warner, and the Moldavite section of The Book of Stones by Robert Simmons and Naisha Ahsian.


0 comments

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published